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Guide to using display screen equipment (dse) at work

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Our Guide to Using Display Screen Equipment (DSE) at Work provides comprehensive instructions for safe and ergonomic utilisation, promoting employee wellbeing.

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What is a Guide to using display screen equipment (dse) at work?

An employer should have a guide to using DSE at work because it is their responsibility to ensure the health and safety of their employees while they work. Prolonged use of DSE can lead to a range of health issues, including eye strain, headaches, neck and shoulder pain, and back pain, which can affect an employee's productivity and quality of work. By providing a guide to using DSE, an employer can help their employees to use DSE correctly, reducing the risk of developing these issues and promoting a safe and healthy workplace.

Furthermore, regulations such as the Display Screen Equipment Regulations 1992 (DSE Regulations) in the UK, require employers to assess the risks associated with DSE use and take steps to prevent or reduce them. This includes providing training and information to employees on how to use DSE safely and comfortably. A guide to using DSE can help employers to meet their legal obligations and promote a culture of health and safety in the workplace.

Guide to using display screen equipment (dse) at work
guide to using display screen equipment (dse) at work

What legal and best practice aspects should employers be aware of?

Here are some key UK employment legislation about using DSE at work:

  1. Display Screen Equipment Regulations 1992 (DSE Regulations): This regulation sets out the legal requirements for employers to assess and manage the risks associated with DSE use, including the provision of training and information to employees on how to use DSE safely.
  2. Health and Safety at Work Act 1974: This act requires employers to ensure the health, safety, and welfare of their employees, including providing a safe working environment and equipment, such as DSE.
  3. Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999: This regulation requires employers to carry out risk assessments to identify and manage health and safety risks in the workplace, including those associated with DSE use.
  4. Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992: This regulation requires employers to provide suitable personal protective equipment (PPE) where necessary to protect employees from health and safety risks in the workplace, including those associated with DSE use.
  5. Working Time Regulations 1998: This regulation sets limits on the amount of time employees can work, including the use of DSE, to prevent health and safety risks associated with fatigue and stress. It also requires employers to provide regular breaks and rest periods for employees who use DSE regularly.

Guide to using Display Screen Equipment (DSE) at work


DSE, or Display Screen Equipment, refers to any device that has a screen, such as a computer monitor, laptop, or tablet. Using DSE for extended periods can cause a range of health issues, including eye strain, headaches, neck and shoulder pain, and back pain. Therefore, it is essential to use DSE correctly to minimize the risk of developing these issues. Here's a guide to using DSE at work:

  1. Adjust Your Chair: Sit with your feet flat on the floor, and your hips as far back in the chair as possible. Adjust the backrest to support your lower back, and adjust the height so that your elbows are level with the desk. Your knees should be at the same level as your hips.

  2. Adjust Your Monitor: Position the monitor directly in front of you, about an arm's length away. The top of the screen should be at or slightly below eye level. Tilt the monitor so that you can see the screen without bending your neck.

  3. Use Proper Lighting: Use lighting that is bright enough to see the screen without causing glare. Avoid having bright lights or windows behind the screen, which can cause eye strain.

  4. Take Regular Breaks: Take short breaks every 20-30 minutes to rest your eyes and stretch your muscles. Look away from the screen and focus on something in the distance to relax your eye muscles.

  5. Maintain Good Posture: Keep your shoulders relaxed and your elbows close to your body. Avoid slouching forward or leaning back in your chair.

  6. Use a Document Holder: If you need to refer to documents while working, use a document holder to position them at the same height and distance as your monitor. This can help reduce neck and eye strain.

  7. Use Proper Keyboard and Mouse: Position your keyboard and mouse close to your body and at the same height. Use a wrist rest to keep your wrists in a neutral position while typing.

  8. Adjust Font Size: Adjust the font size and contrast on your screen so that it is easy to read without straining your eyes.

By following these guidelines, you can minimize the risk of developing health issues related to using DSE at work. Remember to take regular breaks and adjust your workstation to suit your individual needs. If you experience any discomfort or pain, consult your employer or a healthcare professional.

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