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All document template pack

Full access to every letter, form, guide and policy on my site. That's everything contained in the following template packs:

The categories above can also all be purchased separately, if you just need more specific documents.

Whats included in this pack?

All 255 documents listed below with unlimited downloads for 12 months from the date of purchase. You will benefit from free updates to these documents and any new documents as and when they are added to this pack.

Recruitment documents

Contract of employment documents

Contracts (or Terms and Conditions of Employment) serve as the legal basis for employment. Before you issue them, make sure that you can stand behind their contents. They are, after all, legally binding and you should be fully satisfied that the terms and conditions you have spelled out for the new employee are exactly what they should be.

Employee referencing documents

References are an incredibly important factor of recruitment for one main reason; they validate (or not) what the candidate has put on their CV and told you during selection.

All references must be fair and accurate. They should be used as a supplement to an interview, and will only come into play if they contradict what the candidate says at the interview.

Contrary to popular belief, an employer can give a bad reference and include details if an employee was dismissed, as long as there is evidence to back up the statement, such as warning letters or appraisal notes.

Induction documents

Induction is an essential part of on boarding your new recruits and familiarising them with your organisation. Getting the induction process right can help you get new employees up to speed and productive as quickly as possible.

Having a comprehensive, structured induction process has been shown to play a big part in improving long-term staff retention.

Job application documents

The application is usually the first step of the process, and its goal is to make sure that the applicant meets the basic requirements of the job. Examples of such requirements include meeting required levels of education and work experience to perform the job effectively.

It is vitally important to acknowledge an application, to give a good impression to the candidate, and comfort that they are being managed in a professional manner.

Job creation documents

Before you commence the process or recruiting a candidate, there are some housekeeping tasks to complete so that the role is fully understood, the right stakeholders are selected, and the role is appropriately signed off.

Job interviewing documents

Interviews are arguably the most subjective part of any selection system. As humans, we have to fight the tendency to judge people according to whether we simply like them or not, as opposed to making sure that the candidates are being graded on job-relevant characteristics.

Being inherently subjective, I suggest that interviews come after more objective components of the process such as job applications or testing.

Job offer documents

Job offer letters start the employment relationship off on a positive note. They let the candidate know that they were chosen specifically and that you recognise the skills and experience they bring to your company. This encourages new employees to feel confident, not only of their decision to have accepted your job offer, but in their ability to perform the job itself.

Probation documents

Probation periods give you the opportunity to assess new recruits on the job.

It’s common for employers to discover, a few weeks into the employment relationship, that new hires don’t deliver the skills or performance they promised at interview, have poor timekeeping or attendance, or are a bad fit in terms of personality or organisational culture. Probationary periods allow you to manage the relationship more flexibly, so you can address problems before agreeing on a full contract.

Management documents

Absence documents

Absence can come in many forms, some unavoidable (emergencies), some vital (family, holidays - for wellbeing), some manageable (education, long term absences), and some unwanted (such as absenteeism - short term sickness).

Finding ways to navigate through the many absences that are taken in Companies every day and ensure that absneces are managed well, and employees understand the rules and their responsibilities is essential.

This section provides you wit a number of key documents for many eventualities.

Contract documents

An employment contract is an agreement that covers the working relationship of a company and an employee. It allows both parties to clearly understand their obligations and the terms of employment.

To change a contract requires agreement between both parties, or reasonable notice if agreement ultimatey cannot be sought.

COVID-19 documents

Organisations must adapt to changes to ensure that the threat of COVID is reduced. The organisation and its workforce must understand what they need to do differently to ensure continuity of business.

This section includes some best practice documents to support the ways in which an organisation can implement changes to help manage the threat of Coronavirus / COVID-19.

Disciplinary documents

Disciplinary procedures enable you to ensure that employees keep to the rules. More importantly, they enable you, as an employer, to ensure that all breaches of the rules are dealt with fairly and consistently.

If disciplinary rules and procedures are written correctly and used effectively, not only should the work place be a happier working environment but also, the business owner will minimise the potential of being taken to an Employment Tribunal.

Disciplinary procedures should be seen as an aid to effective management, to be used primarily as a means of modifying people’s behaviour in line with the organisation’s aims – not just as a mechanism for imposing sanctions.

Employee Communication documents

Communicating with your employees is central to managing your workforce. Poor communication can result in misunderstandings and mistrust. Introducing proper procedures for informing and consulting with your employees can take time and money but you will benefit from improved products, productivity and competitiveness.

Flexible working documents

Flexible working is a way of working that suits an employee’s needs, for example having flexible start and finish times, or working from home.

All employees have the legal right to request flexible working - not just parents and carers. This is known as ‘making a statutory application’. Employees must have worked for the same employer for at least 26 weeks to be eligible.

Grievance documents

Grievances may be concerned with a wide range of issues, including the allocation of work, the working environment or conditions, the lack of opportunities for career development or the way in which someone has been managed.

Health and Safety documents

It is the duty of care of every employer to maintain the health and safety of each employee. H&S crosses over with HR frequently, and this section contains templates to support health and safety management.

Investigation documents

Undertaking an investigation will often be required as part of a disciplinary or grievance process.

In order to ensure that the investigation was fair and appropriate it is good practice to plan, record and invite correctly.

Here are some templates that can be used for a disciplinary or grievance investigation process. 

Learning and development documents

Improving the skills of your staff is vital and will deliver huge business benefits. It can increase their productivity, motivation and quality of work, and boost overall business profits and customer satisfaction.

Parental leave documents

Statutory leave for family reasons is a complicated area where the law has changed frequently in recent years and, as an employer, it is important that your policies and procedures are kept up-to-date.

Employees who are pregnant, new mothers and adoptive parents (and the partners of such employees) may be entitled to statutory time off around the birth or adoption of their child: maternity leave, paternity leave, adoption leave and/or parental leave. In some cases, this leave may be paid if the employee meets the qualifying criteria.

Performance appraisal documents

Performance Appraisals or Performance Reviews as sometimes they are known are an individual plan for each employee. 

An appraisal should reflect the employee’s job, their key responsibilities, their wider participation within the team and their overall contribution (or expected contribution) to company-wide business objectives.

Appraisals should focus on performance and personal development with specific areas for employees and employers to concentrate their efforts on above and beyond the day-to-day environment.

Performance Improvement Plan documents

A performance improvement plan (PIP) is a tool to give an employee with performance issues the opportunity to succeed. It may be used to address failures to meet specific job goals or behaviour-related concerns.

Termination documents

Exit interview documents

By performing an exit interview with an employee before they go, you’ll have an opportunity to get honest feedback about positive and negative experiences, identify potential areas of opportunity for increasing employee retention, identify opportunities to improve engagement, and get valuable insight to help hire their replacement.

Probation and early termination documents

Probation can be broadly defined as a trial period for newly recruited workers. Probation periods commonly last for three months, six months, or a year.

Employees on a probationary period won't have worked for you long enough to qualify for unfair dismissal protection. However, they are still protected against harassment and dismissal for 'protected reasons' such as gender, age, ethnicity, disability, religion and cultural background.

Redundancy documents

Ensuring that you manage a redundancy process fairly and effectively is vital to good communication, and avoiding claims from employees.

A redundancy situation can arise where:

  1. the employer has ceased, or intends to cease, to carry on the business for the purposes of which the employee was so employed,
  2. the employer has ceased, or intends to cease, to carry on the business in the place where the employee was so employed
  3. the requirements of the business for employees to carry out work of a particular kind has ceased or diminished or are expected to cease or diminish, or
  4. the requirements of the business for the employees to carry out work of a particular kind, in the place where they were so employed, has ceased or diminished or are expected to cease or diminish.

Referencing documents

Model letters and forms to help you create and maintain legally compliant documents for your organisation on reference responses.

Resignation documents

Model letters and forms to help you create and maintain legally compliant documents for your organisation on resignations.

Retirement documents

Retirement is the withdrawal from one's position or occupation or from one's active working life.

Settlement agreement documents

Settlement agreements are legally binding contracts which can be used to end an employment relationship on agreed terms. They can also be used to resolve an ongoing workplace dispute, for example, a dispute over holiday pay. These agreements can be proposed by either an employer or an employee, although it will normally be the employer.

Once a valid settlement agreement has been signed, the employee will be unable to make an employment tribunal claim about any type of claim which is listed on the agreement.

Where the employer and employee are unable to reach an agreement, the settlement discussions cannot usually be referred to as evidence in any subsequent unfair dismissal claim. Where the settlement discussions are held to resolve an existing dispute between the parties they cannot be used as evidence in any type of claim.

TUPE documents

TUPE stands for the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations and its purpose is to protect employees if the business in which they are employed changes hands. Its effect is to move employees and any liabilities associated with them from the old employer to the new employer by operation of law.

TUPE applies every day to a range of different business transactions and it is essential that employers of all sizes understand the liabilities that can arise.

TUPE can apply when employers:

  • sell or buy part or all of a business as a going concern;
  • outsource or make a "service provision change" involving either (a) an initial outsourcing of a service (e.g. where services transfer from the customer to an external contractor); (b) a subsequent transfer (e.g. where services transfer from the first external contractor to a different external contractor; and (c) bringing the service back in-house (e.g. where services transfer from an external contractor back to the customer)
  • grant or take over a lease or licence of premises and operate the same business from those premises.

TUPE has impacts for the employer who is making the transfer (also known as the outgoing employer, the old employer or the transferor) and the employer who is taking on the transfer (also known as the incoming employer, the new employer or the transferee).

Policy documents

Absence and attendance policies

Absence policies allow you to promote your company culture and values in terms of how you approach absence management.

They are an opportunity to highlight:

  • How you approach work-life balance
  • How you handle employees with an unreasonable level of absence
  • How you support everyone to be healthier and provide good employee wellbeing

By addressing these subjects in a formal policy, you will set out good expectations at an early stage, and it will allow you to deal with any issues reasonably and effectively.

Code of conduct policies

Every company should have a code of conduct outlining how employees are supposed to interact and behave while at work. By setting rules and expectations, employees know how to act at work and can be more successful in their roles.

A code of conduct, also called privacy and code of conduct, are the policies and rules both employees and employers must adhere to. These guidelines outline how people should appropriately interact with one another at work. 

Why is a code of conduct important?

  1. It demonstrates a company's values

  2. It provides guidelines for behaviour

  3. It helps the Company to act within the law

  4. It helps to improve and maintain employee morale

  5. It enables Companies to measure employee success

Contract policies

Model policies to help you create and maintain legally compliant rules for your organisation on contracts.

Equal opportunities policies

It is against the law for a company to discriminate against anyone on the grounds of age, disability, sex, gender reassignment, pregnancy, maternity, race (which includes colour, nationality and ethnic or national origins), sexual orientation, religion or belief, or because someone is married or in a civil partnership. Similarly if your employees discriminate against a colleague or customer your company could be held vicariously liable for their acts, and be responsible for paying the compensation or damages to the victim of the discrimination.

Expenses, travel, gifts and memberships policies

Model policies to help you create and maintain legally compliant rules for your organisation on expenses, travel, gifts and memberships.

Terminating Employment policies

Model policies to help you create and maintain legally compliant rules for your organisation on terminations.

Training and development policies

Model policies to help you create and maintain legally compliant rules for your organisation on training and development.

Wellbeing policies

Model policies to help you create and maintain legally compliant rules for your organisation on wellbeing.

Referencing documents

Model letters and forms to help you create and maintain legally compliant documents for your organisation on reference responses.

Probation documents

Probation periods give you the opportunity to assess new recruits on the job.

Terminating Employment policies

Model policies to help you create and maintain legally compliant rules for your organisation on terminations.

Training and development policies

Model policies to help you create and maintain legally compliant rules for your organisation on training and development.